C. Wright Mills wrote The Sociological Imagination in 1959. His book helps us understand the field of sociology–our topic of discussion for Tuesday. We read the article, “The Sociological Perspective,” from the textbook In Conflict and Order: Understanding Society. I have broken the chapter’s main points down into a series of questions, which I would like the students to go over during our class discussion. Each student will be assigned one or two discussion questions. Please answer the question with definitions, several examples, and further discussion questions for the class. Write your summary answer in this blog posting below in the comments section. You can also include any relevant links. Look over the sociological memes that students from last semester created, by clicking here

1. The author opens with the concept of “ideological traps” running our lives. What does that mean? 
2. What does sociology study? Examples at the personal, societal and global levels? 
3. Individuals are socially determined. 
4. Individuals have agency: they create, sustain, and change the social forms within which they conduct their lives. 3 parts. 
5. C. Wright Mills and The Sociological Imagination
6. Why is sociology frightening? The author provides at least two ideas. 
7. What are the types of questions that sociology asks (p. 10)? four types. 
8. What are the three problems with the idea of value neutrality when studying social phenomenon? 
9. What does Howard Zinn mean by saying, as his documentary movie is titled, You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train?
10. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about survey research.
11. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about variables. 
12. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about longitudinal surveys. 
13. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about experiments. 
14. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about observation.
15. In the section on Sources on Data, the author overviews different ways in which sociologists gather information. Please tell us about existing data. 
16. Sociologically speaking, what does class consciousness and class conflict mean? 
17. Sociologically speaking, what does false consciousness mean?  

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